Story Sequencing

Title: Story Sequencing

Grade: K

Art Discipline: Visual Arts

Time Frame: 35 minutes

Lesson Overview: Students correctly sequence pictures of a book using their knowledge of pattern and organization to predict the story. 


GLO(s): 2. Community Contributor; 3. Complex Thinker


Arts Benchmark: How the Arts Shape and Reflect Culture – FA.K.1.5: Explain the concept that all artwork is meant to be appreciated and some artwork is also meant to be useful.

Rubric based on Arts Benchmark:

Advanced

Proficient

Partially Proficient

Novice

Explain in great detail, the concept that all artwork is meant to be appreciated and some artwork is also meant to be useful.

Explain in detail, the concept that all artwork is meant to be appreciated and some artwork is also meant to be useful.

Explain in some detail, the concept that all artwork is meant to be appreciated and some artwork is also meant to be useful.

Explain in minimal detail, the concept that all artwork is meant to be appreciated and some artwork is also meant to be useful.

Key Arts Vocabulary: pattern, line, shape, color


Content Area Benchmark: Understanding Text Structures – LA.K.2.1: Use pictures and titles to make predictions about a text.

Content Area Rubric:

Advanced

Proficient

Partially Proficient

Novice

Make insightful predictions based on pictures and titles with clarity and specific details.

Make predictions about a text that are likely to be true based on pictures and titles.

Make obvious or trivial predictions about a text, based on partially on pictures and titles.

Make predictions not based on pictures or titles in a text.


Classroom Set Up: Students are seated as a group on the carpet.

Materials & Equipment needed:

  • A picture book that demonstrates the elements of line, shape, and color and has a good story structure.

Suggested Example: Harriet Ziefert. Lunchtime for a Purple Snake. Houghton Mifflin/Walter Lorraine Books, 2003. ISBN 0618311335

  • Copies of selected pictures from the book, excluding text, that sequentially and pictorially tell the story

Prior to this lesson, students need to know the elements of line, shape, and color.


# Minutes

Procedure

Create

Perform

Respond

3

Patterns are things that repeat. Stories have patterns, or things that repeat, to help the reader know what will happen next in the story. This is called prediction. Readers can make predictions based on pictures in the story. Picture books have writing and pictures. The artist, who created these pictures, used patterns by repeating art elements like lines, shapes and colors. This also helps the reader in predicting.

     

12

Look at the cover of this book. Look at the title. Can you make a prediction about the story just from the title? What would that be? Look at the picture. What colors, shapes, and lines do you see? Can you predict what the story is about from looking at the picture on the cover? What do you think it is? What clues or details in the picture make you say this?

I have copied three pictures from the book. I have mixed them up so that they are not in the order that they appear in the book.

Tell me what you see in this picture. What do you think is happening? What details in the picture gives you a clue about what is happening?

(Teacher note: Go through each picture and ask similar questions.)

   

check mark

5

We’ve looked at all the pictures. What order do you think they should go in? Who can come up here and select the beginning picture? The middle? The end?

   

check mark

10

Now, I’ll read the book to you and we will see if we were correct in our predictions.

     

5

Closing Reflection with students:

   

 

Were we correct in our predictions?

Does the artwork help you predict the story? How?

Do you enjoy (appreciate) looking at the artwork as you listen to the story? Why?

    check mark

Responding (Questions to ask students before, during, or after an activity in the lesson to elicit their thinking about their own work or about work they are studying):

Step 1: Describe

Step 2: Interpret

Step 3: Evaluate

Describe what you see in the picture. Lines? Shapes? Colors?

 

What do you think is happening in this picture? Why?

Does this picture make you feel a certain way? Explain.

Does the artwork help you predict the story? How?

Do you enjoy (appreciate) looking at the artwork as you listen to the story? Why?


 

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