The Wind

Title: The Wind

Grade: K

Art Discipline:

Music

Time Frame:

30 minutes

Lesson Overview: The students create vocal sounds that will "mimic" the sound of the wind during different weather patterns demonstrating a range of sounds – high, low, loud, quiet.


GLO(s): 3. Complex Thinker, 4. Quality Producer


Arts Benchmark: How the Arts are Organized – FA.K.2.2: Demonstrate simple representation of high and low, short and long, loud and soft, fast and slow.

Rubric based on Arts Benchmark:

Advanced

Proficient

Partially Proficient

Novice

Demonstrate an extensive variety of simple representations of high and low, short and long, loud and soft, and fast and slow.

Demonstrate a variety of simple representations of high and low, short and long, loud and soft, and fast and slow.

Demonstrate some simple representations of high and low, short and long, loud and soft, and fast and slow.

Demonstrate one or two simple representations of high and low, short and long, loud and soft, and fast and slow.

Key Arts Vocabulary: voice, dynamics (loud/quiet), high/low, tempo (fast/slow), echo, symphony orchestra


Classroom Set Up: Gathered as a group on the floor.

Materials & Equipment needed:

Poem by Christina Georgina Rosetti: "Who has Seen the Wind"

CD Player

Beethoven, Symphony No. 6 'Pastoral,' London 417 765-2 (Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Sir Georg Solti)

Prior to this lesson, students need to know some sound qualities of the wind.

Teaching Tips: Create a calm space and atmosphere before beginning, as this activity can get quite noisy.


# Minutes

Procedure

Create

Perform

Respond

3

(Teacher note:   Recite this poem.  Say it several times with a different quality of voice - loud, quiet, natural; fast or slow.)

"Who has seen the wind?

Neither you nor I

But when the leaves bow down their heads,

The wind is passing by."

     

2

Can you use your voice to make some wind sounds?  (Allow students time to explore random sounds.)

Can they go high? 

Now can they go low?

How about fast and slow?

(Teacher note: Encourage experimentation with voice.)

check mark

   

3

What happens when there is a storm? Are the sounds fast or slow? Using your voice can you show me what the wind sounds like during a storm?  What are some things that happen during a storm?   

What if there is thunder and lightning? Are the sounds loud or quiet?  Again, using your voice, can you show me?

check mark

 

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2

(Teacher note: Teach the students “Who has seen the Wind?” by having students echo each line, then 2 lines, then the whole rhyme until they have learned the whole poem.)

 

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5

Can we say this poem as if we were in the midst of a storm? 

How about if we were lying calmly in bed?

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(Let students suggest other scenarios with the wind – calm, playful, strong, etc. Let them experiment with their voices to create these sounds and say the poem).

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10

Let's listen to how a composer using a symphony orchestra described the wind.  (Teacher note: play about 2 minutes of the 4th movement of Symphony No. 6.)    What kind of weather did the music represent? How could we tell?  Was it loud or quiet? 

Now let's listen to another part of the same composition.  (Teacher note: Play the beginning of the 5th movement of Symphony No. 6.)

Was this part same or different?  If different, how?  (loud/quiet, fast/slow) How did this part make you feel?  What kind of weather was being played?

   

check mark

5

Closing Reflection with students:

   

 

Describe what you heard the orchestra do to make the sounds of the storm. When you used your voice to create a storm, how does it differ from the orchestra? Which did you prefer, your voices as the storm or the orchestra’s version? Why?     check mark

Responding (Questions to ask students before, during, or after an activity in the lesson to elicit their thinking about their own work or about work they are studying):

Step 1: Describe

Step 2: Interpret

Step 3: Evaluate

Describe your voice when you use it to represent a storm.

Describe what you heard the orchestra do to make the sounds of the storm.

When you used your voice to create a storm, how does it differ from the orchestra?

Which did you prefer, your voices as the storm or the orchestra’s version? Why?


 

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