Shapes to Forms

Title: Shapes to Forms

Grade:  1

Art Discipline: Visual Arts

Time Frame: 30 minutes

Lesson Overview: Students create a drawing of a two-dimensional geometric shape and its three-dimensional cylinder counterpart.


GLO(s): 3. Complex Thinker


Arts Benchmark: How the Arts are Organized – FA.1.1.3: Differentiate between two-dimensional and three-dimensional artwork.

Rubric based on Arts Benchmark:

Advanced

Proficient

Partially Proficient

Novice

Differentiate between two-dimensional and three-dimensional artwork with accuracy.

Differentiate between two-dimensional and three-dimensional artwork with no significant errors.

Differentiate between two-dimensional and three-dimensional artwork with few significant errors.

Differentiate between two-dimensional and three-dimensional artwork with many significant errors.

Key Arts Vocabulary: two-dimensional shapes (rectangle, square, circle, oval, triangle), three-dimensional forms (pyramid, cone, cylinder, box, cube, sphere, egg or ellipsis)


Content Area Benchmark: Geometric Shapes and their Properties and Relationships – MA.1.5.2: Identify attributes and parts of common two-and three-dimensional shapes.

Content Area Rubric:

Advanced

Proficient

Partially Proficient

Novice

Identify attributes and parts of common two-and three-dimensional shapes, with accuracy.

Identify attributes and parts of common two-and three-dimensional shapes, with no significant errors.

Identify attributes and parts of common two-and three-dimensional shapes, with few significant errors.

Identify attributes and parts of common two-and three-dimensional shapes, with many significant errors.


Classroom Set Up: Regular class seating.

Materials & Equipment needed:

  • Cut out examples of the basic two-dimensional geometric shapes: Triangle, Rectangle, Square, Circle, Oval. (Note: Oak tag is a good material to use.)
  • Examples of common items that represent basic forms. For example: ice cream cone (cone), child’s block (cube), shoe box (rectangular box), egg (ellipsis), triangular prism, oatmeal container or can (cylinder), ball (sphere)
  • Pencil and paper

Prior to this lesson, students need to know geometric shapes and forms, gradation and how to draw a value (gray) scale. They should have some experience with contour drawing. 

Teaching Tips: Math terminology is two-dimensional and three-dimensional shapes. Form is a visual art term, as noted in the glossary. Extensions of this lesson would be to use other shapes and their counterpart forms, one at a time, or have various shapes and forms on different tables and letting students rotate them to draw the various shapes and forms.

 

steps to drawing a cylinder

# Minutes

Procedure

Create

Perform

Respond

5

 

Shapes are flat. When artists talk about form, they are referring to  three-dimensional shapes or objects. I’m going to show you an example of a two-dimensional shape. (Teacher note: Shows the circle shape.)

   

 

Now look at these objects that are not flat. You can see several sides of the object. Artists call these forms, and they are also called three-dimensional shapes.      

Who can find the three-dimensional form of this flat shape I hold in my hand?

What do the shape and its form have in common?

(Teacher note: Students might describe the common number of sides, or similar attributes. Continue looking at a few more shape and form pairs, repeating the description question of common attributes. E.g., Square-Cube, Triangle-Cone/Pyramid, Rectangle-Rectangle Prism/Box, Oval-Ellipse/Egg, Rectangle, circle – Cylinder side, top or bottom)

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10

(Teacher note: Pass out paper and pencil. Demonstrate drawing the cylinder on the board or overhead first before students begin their drawing. See illustration   below.)

 

 
 

Today we are going to learn how to draw a three-dimensional shape or form called a cylinder. First we will draw the flat shape of its front. Can you picture what that would be? (Rectangle). If we were to put it on its side, so that you would be looking at the cylinder’s top or bottom, what shape would it be? (Circle). Watch as I draw a cylinder.

  • First, draw a vertical rectangle.
  • Next, erase the top and bottom line. Replace the bottom line with line that is not straight but dips down slightly. Replace the top line with a line that slightly dips, exactly like the bottom line. Can you see that it’s beginning to look like a three-dimensional form?
  • Take the top dipped line and flip it to complete the top of the cylinder.
  • Finally, use the pencil to shade the cylinder, darkest on one side, and gradually getting lighter and lighter. Leave the opposite side of the cylinder white, as if light is hitting that side.
     

Now it’s your turn to draw. First draw a rectangle. (Teacher note: Talk students through each step of the procedure.)

check mark    
Leave your drawing on your desk. Let’s walk around the room and look at each other’s drawings.   check mark  

5

 

Closing Reflection with students:

Describe the differences between the shapes and forms that you drew.

Can you name some shapes and forms that are in our everyday world?

What would you do to improve your drawing?

 
   

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Responding (Questions to ask students before, during, or after an activity in the lesson to elicit their thinking about their own work or about work they are studying):

Step 1: Describe

Step 2: Interpret

Step 3: Evaluate

Describe the attributes of 2-D and 3-D shapes.

Describe the differences between the shapes and forms that you drew.

Can you name some shapes and forms that are in our every day world?

 

What would you do to improve your drawing?

 

 

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