Color Moods

Title:  Color Moods

Grade: 2

Art Discipline:

Visual Arts

Time Frame:

45 minutes

Lesson Overview: Students create quick abstract drawings, using color, line, and shape, to convey the moods of different selections of instrumental music.


GLO(s): 4. Effective Communicator; 3. Complex Thinker


Arts Benchmark: How the Arts Communicate – FA.2.1.2: Use color to convey mood in works of art.

Rubric based on Arts Benchmark:

Advanced

Proficient

Partially Proficient

Novice

Consistently use color to convey mood in works of art.

Usually use color to convey mood in works of art.

Sometimes use color to convey mood in works of art.

Rarely use color to convey mood in works of art.

Key Arts Vocabulary:   line, shape, color, warm, cool, intensity, abstract, media


Classroom Set Up:   Students gathered in circle and regular classroom seating.

Materials & Equipment needed:

CD player

3 Selections of instrumental music pieces that have different moods. Classical selections might include portions from Tchaikovsky’s The Nutcracker Suite (“Trepak” or “Arabian Dance”), Ravel’s Bolero, Prokofiev’s Peter and the Wolf, Rimsky-Korsakov’s Scheherazade (“The Sea and Sinbad’s Ship” or “The Young Prince and the Young Princess”), Holst’s The Planets (contrasting “Mars, the Bringer of War” and “Venus, the Bringer of Peace”)

Each student needs:

  • Pencils, crayons, oil pastels, or colored pencils
  • 6 x 9 drawing paper (3 per student)

Abstract and representational art prints that convey different moods through the element of color 

Suggested representational art prints:

“Blue”, somber mood: works from Pablo Picasso’s Blue Period such as The Tragedy (1903); compare with

“Rosie”, happy mood: works from Pablo Picasso’s Rose Period such as Harlequin’s Family with and Ape (1905)

Suggested abstract prints:

  • Compare Paul Klee’s Tunisian Garden to The Golden Fish
  • Wassily Kandinsky prints that show his use of angles and the elements such as Mit Und Gegen, Helles Bild, Balancement, Structure Joyeuse, On White II

Links

Prior to this lesson, students need to know the elements of line, shape and color.

Teaching Tips:

  • Each music selection should convey different moods.
  • Prior to the lesson, you may want to review how different lines convey different moods (See FA.K.1.1 All Kinds of Lines).
  • Depending on art prints used, teacher may wish to explain or review the difference between abstract and representational art. (See Glossary.)
  • The above web sites have certain art pieces available to print for overhead transparencies. (If using Kandinsky, see FA 4.1.5 Angles on Kandinsky for more information.)

# Minutes

Procedure

Create

Perform

Respond

10

(Teacher note: Gather students around the art prints.)      

What kinds of moods or emotions do we experience? (happy, sad, angry, frightened, lonely, energetic, etc.) Artists use color, line and shapes to convey emotion or mood in their work.

What colors, lines, and shapes do you see in these art prints? Do these elements make you feel a certain way? What mood is being communicated? How does the artist use color, line or shape to convey this mood?

(Teacher note: Share background information on the art prints.)

What moods come to your mind when you see:

Red or pinks? (happy; excitement; playful)

Blues or purples? (somber, sad, scary)

Greens? (quiet, calm)

Orange and yellow? (lively, active)

Warm colors (red, orange, and yellow) make us think of lively and warm things. They also jump out or forward in the picture. Cool colors (blue, green, and purple) recede back, and give us a more calming, and sometimes sad or thoughtful mood. The intensity or brightness of a color also conveys a mood. For instance, a bright red has a very different mood when compared with a dull red or pink.

   

check mark

25

Today we are going to use music to influence the mood of our artwork.  I am going to play three different types of instrumental music.

You have 3 pieces of paper, one for each music selection, and oil pastels, crayons and pencils. While the music is playing, think about the mood the music is communicating. Choose your media and create an abstract drawing to express this mood using only color, lines, and shapes.

These will be quick drawings, and you will only have 7 minutes to complete each one. When you complete your piece, sign your name on the bottom and write the number, 1, 2, or 3, that corresponds to the music selection.

(Teacher note: Play each music selection for 7 minutes. Let them know how much time they have left for each selection, e.g., “Five minutes remaining.” “One minute to go, start finishing up.”)

check mark

 

 
Pick one drawing and place it here on the carpet, our exhibit space. Gather around and let’s take a look at what you have done.   check mark  

10

Closing Reflection with students:

Describe the colors, lines, and shapes in the artwork.

Which moods were represented in the music that you listened to? Are these moods communicated in the artwork? Explain.

What title would you give this artwork? Does it capture the feeling of the artwork? Why? Why not?

What would you do differently next time?

   

 

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Responding (Questions to ask students before, during, or after an activity in the lesson to elicit their thinking about their own work or about work they are studying):

Step 1: Describe

Step 2: Interpret

Step 3: Evaluate

Describe the colors, lines, and shapes in the artwork.

Which moods were represented in the music that you listened to? Are these moods communicated in the artwork? Explain.

What title would you give this artwork? Does it capture the feeling of the artwork? Why? Why not?

What would you do differently next time?


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